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El Mundo Boston 2018.

JUAN AGUDELO

Professional Soccer Player, New England Revolution

Age: 24

Heritage: Colombian

 

Notable Accomplishments:

●  NE Revolution’s leading scorer in 2016

●  Capped 23 times by the United States national team

●  Five-Time Selection to Major League Soccer's 24 under 24

●  Second-youngest player ever to score for the U.S. Men’s National Team

 

By Alejandro Ramirez

 

Born in Colombia, Juan Agudelo was brought to the United States when he was 7 years old.  When he was 17, his debut on the United States Men’s National Soccer Team consisted of his scoring an impressive goal against South Africa, helping to secure a 1-0 victory for the Stars and Stripes.

 

At the time, he was the youngest player ever to score for the US men’s team.

 

Now 24, Agudelo has since made 23 international appearances for the U.S. - an opportunity he doesn’t take lightly.

 

“You feel that weight on the jersey whenever you put it on… there’re a lot more eyes, and ambition and desire just to represent. It’s always an honor,” he said.

 

Agudelo is now a forward for the New England Revolution, where he’s established himself as one of the club’s top scorers and a budding young star in Major League Soccer.

 

His MLS career started as teenager with the New York Red Bulls Academy. He signed to the Red Bulls as a Homegrown Player and later played with Los Angeles club Chivas USA before joining the New England Revolution in the middle of the 2013 season.

 

Over time, the young soccer phenom has grown into a better-rounded player; he has been named to the MLS 24 under 24 on five occasions. Regardless, Agudelo says there’s still plenty to learn about the game and about life.

 

 “Even if you’re 30, 34 in the soccer game, there’s a lot to learn,” he said. “And it’s not just soccer, but communicating abilities, friendships... being a good human being. There are lot more things than just soccer.”

 

Particularly important in his life now is his family; he has a wife and two daughters and prioritizes what will be best for them.

 

Off the field, he’s an active supporter of the New England Association for Colombian Children (NEACOL), an association dedicated helping Colombian children living in poverty.

 

Going forward, Agudelo hopes to play more international games and represent the U.S. in the World Cup.

 

“[I want to] represent the country that has done a lot for me and represent them on the big stage as much as possible,” he said.

 

Off the field, his goals are no less admirable: “Be a good father, be a good husband, and be a good human-being to the community,” he said.